Integral Logistics Management — Operations Management and Supply Chain Management Within and Across Companies

17.2.6 Operation and Routing Sheet

Intended learning outcomes: Present the concepts of the operation business object in association with the routing sheet. Describe the most important attributes of the operation master object. Produce an overview on the work center where-used list.



Section 1.2.3 introduces the operation business object in association with the routing sheet and resource requirement or process plan business objects. This section provides a detailed description of the operation object, particularly its most important attributes. An operation is described by at least the following attributes (see also Figure 17.2.1.1):

  • Product ID (the product identification); this is an item ID
  • Sequential number or operations sequence number; this defines the order in which the operations are carried out
  • Work center ID of the primary work center, that is, where the operation is normally scheduled to be performed
  • Work center ID of the alternate work center, that is, where the operation is not normally scheduled to be but can be performed
  • Operation description, which may consist of several lines; this is ideally a typical concise description, followed by detailed information
  • Standard setup load (see Section 13.1.2)
  • Standard run load per unit (see Section 13.1.2)
  • Setup time and run time per unit or the formulas for converting from setup load and run load to setup time and run time
  • Technical wait time after the operation (see Section 13.1.3)
  • Effective dates (start and stop). On these dates, the operation is to be added or removed from the routing sheet; effectivity control may also be by engineering change number or serial number rather than date
The operation IDis the union of the product ID and operation number attributes.

The routing sheet or routing can be derived from its operations, just as the bill of material can be derived from its bill-of-material positions. A product forms a 1-to-n association with its operations.

An alternate routing is a routing, usually less preferred than the primary routing, but resulting in an identical item.

An alternate operation is a replacement for a normal step in the manufacturing process.

Alternate routings and operations may be maintained in the computer or offline via manual methods, but the computer software must be able to accept alternate routings and operations for specific jobs (see [APIC16]).

A work center where-used list provides an indication of how a work center is used in products, or more precisely in the operations for products.

As with the where-used list for components, the work center where-used list addresses the operations from the work center viewpoint, as a supplement to the product viewpoint. See Figure 17.2.3.2. A work center also forms a 1-to-n association with the operations.

Aspects of computerized administration:

  • There are transactions that allow the entire routing sheet for an assembly or a partial routing sheet to be assigned to another assembly. There are also transactions that allow large-scale modi­fications to be carried out, for example, by replacing a certain work center with a different work center in every operation (batch procedure running in background mode).
  • A batch procedure can periodically calculate the sum of certain elements of the lead time and insert the results into the routing sheet in order to quickly recalculate the rough-cut planning (namely, the sum of the setup times, the sum of the run times (for an mean lot size), and the sum of the inter­operation times; see Figure 13.3.2.4).



Course section 17.2: Subsections and their intended learning outcomes

  • 17.2 The Master Data for Products and Processes

    Intended learning outcomes: Describe master data of products, product structure, components, and operations. Explain the data structure of item master, bill of material, and where-used list. Disclose the data structure of work center master data, the work center hierarchy, as well as for operation, routing sheet, production equipment, bill of production equipment, and bill of tools.

  • 17.2.1 Product, Product Structure, Components, and Operations

    Intended learning outcomes: Present the concept of master data. Explain the production order as a collection of master data. Describe a simple product structure. Identify the intermediate product used simultaneously as a component in higher-level products.

  • 17.2.2 Item Master Data

    Intended learning outcomes: Present the concept of the item master record. Describe the attributes of the technical information and the stockkeeping information of the item master record. Identify attributes of the item master record for information on costs and prices.

  • 17.2.3 Bill of Material, Bill-of-Material Position, Where-Used List, and Where-Used-List Position

    Intended learning outcomes: Present the concepts of the bill of material and of the bill-of-material position, the where-used list, and the where-used list position. Differentiate between the single-level bills of material, the multilevel bill of material, and the summarized bill of material. Differentiate between the single-level where-used list, the multilevel where-used list, and the summarized where-used list. Describe the bill-of-material position logistical object and its most important attributes.

  • 17.2.4 Work Center Master Data

    Intended learning outcomes: Present the work-center business object. Describe the attributes of the work-center master record relating to capacity, concerning costs, and for calculating the lead time.

  • 17.2.5 The Work Center Hierarchy

    Intended learning outcomes: Present the concepts of workstation and cost center. Explain the work center hierarchy.

  • 17.2.6 Operation and Routing Sheet

    Intended learning outcomes: Present the concepts of the operation business object in association with the routing sheet. Describe the most important attributes of the operation master object. Produce an overview on the work center where-used list.

  • 17.2.7 Production Equipment, Bill of Production Equipment, and Bill of Tools

    Intended learning outcomes: Present the concepts of bill of production equipment and bill-of-production-equipment position as well as production equipment where-used list. Produce an overview on collective tool, bill of tools, bill-of-tools position, and tool where-used list.

  • 17.2.8 Composition of the Basic Master Data Objects

    Intended learning outcomes: Explain the breakdown of the master data into individual classes and their associations using the example of the ball bearing. Describe the basic object classes for planning & control.