Integral Logistics Management — Operations Management and Supply Chain Management Within and Across Companies

17.2.3a Bill of Material, Bill-of-Material Position, and Where-Used List

Intended learning outcomes: Present the concepts of the bill of material, of the bill-of-material position, and the where-used list.



By way of example, Figure 1.2.2.2 shows a bill of material, that is, a convergent product structure with two structure levels. The conventional method used to model the bill-of-material business object does not represent the object as a whole. Instead, it defines a detailed logistical object for that business object.

A bill-of-material position is a product <-> component connection within a bill of material.

Here is an example. Figure 17.2.3.1 contains five items — the three components x, y, and z, each of which occurs in products 1 and 2.

Fig. 17.2.3.1       Representation of two bills of material, each with three components.

The two bills of material lead to detailed objects, that is, six bill-of-material positions. These represent the six connections shown in Figure 17.2.3.2 from the product viewpoint and from the component viewpoint.

Fig. 17.2.3.2       Detailed logistical objects: the six bill-of-material positions as connections in two bills of material, each with three components.

Breaking down bills of material into their individual positions leads directly to further logis­tical objects. They are all derived from the bill-of-material positions by means of algorithms.

A where-used list indicates the way in which a component is used in different products, taking the structural levels into account (see Section 1.2.2).

The component viewpoint in Figure 17.2.3.2, that is, the bottom to top viewpoint in Figure 17.2.3.1, leads to three where-used lists — for the components x, y, and z, each with two uses in products 1 and 2.

Different forms of these bills of material and where-used lists are needed, depending on the application. Each “product « component” connection should only be defined or stored once, however. The only exception to this rule is for components that occur several times in the same product (but are different each time). These occurrences can be differentiated using a relative position number (see below).

Continuation in next subsection (17.2.3b).




Course section 17.2: Subsections and their intended learning outcomes

  • 17.2 The Master Data for Products and Processes

    Intended learning outcomes: Describe master data of products, product structure, components, and operations. Explain the data structure of item master, bill of material, and where-used list. Disclose the data structure of work center master data, the work center hierarchy, as well as for operation, routing sheet, production equipment, bill of production equipment, and bill of tools.

  • 17.2.1 Product, Product Structure, Components, and Operations

    Intended learning outcomes: Present the concept of master data. Explain the production order as a collection of master data. Describe a simple product structure. Identify the intermediate product used simultaneously as a component in higher-level products.

  • 17.2.2 Item Master Data

    Intended learning outcomes: Present the concept of the item master record. Describe the attributes of the technical information and the stockkeeping information of the item master record. Identify attributes of the item master record for information on costs and prices.

  • 17.2.3a Bill of Material, Bill-of-Material Position, and Where-Used List

    Intended learning outcomes: Present the concepts of the bill of material, of the bill-of-material position, and the where-used list.

  • 17.2.5 The Work Center Hierarchy

    Intended learning outcomes: Present the concepts of workstation and cost center. Explain the work center hierarchy.

  • 17.2.6 Operation and Routing Sheet

    Intended learning outcomes: Present the concepts of the operation business object in association with the routing sheet. Describe the most important attributes of the operation master object. Produce an overview on the work center where-used list.

  • 17.2.7 Production Equipment, Bill of Production Equipment, and Bill of Tools

    Intended learning outcomes: Present the concepts of bill of production equipment and bill-of-production-equipment position as well as production equipment where-used list. Produce an overview on collective tool, bill of tools, bill-of-tools position, and tool where-used list.

  • 17.2.8 Composition of the Basic Master Data Objects

    Intended learning outcomes: Explain the breakdown of the master data into individual classes and their associations using the example of the ball bearing. Describe the basic object classes for planning & control.