Integral Logistics Management — Operations Management and Supply Chain Management Within and Across Companies

13.3 Scheduling of Orders and Scheduling Algorithms

Intended learning outcomes: Describe the manufacturing calendar and the calculation of the manufacturing lead time. Differentiate between Backward Scheduling and Forward Scheduling. Explain network planning, central point scheduling, the lead-time stretching factor, and probable scheduling. Present scheduling of process trains.



Scheduling of orders starts from customer-set order deadlines and determines the other required deadlines for feasibility decisions, loading of capacity, and reservations of components.
A scheduling algorithm is a technique of calculation designed to support scheduling of orders. 

Scheduling of orders is mainly the job of the personnel involved in the placing and execution of the order. For these purposes, they should have access to appropriate tools, such as to information technology in the form of ERP software.

Scheduling of orders is based on knowledge of and calculations of lead time. However, time management reveals that there are limits to the accurate estimation of lead times. Not all time elements can be estimated precisely, and perhaps most difficult to assess is queue time. Of additional concern are unanticipated factors that may arise during actual production. Rescheduling is often the necessary consequence.

Rescheduling is the process of changing order or operation due dates, usually as a result of their being out of phase with the time when they are needed ([APIC16]).

Even though it is important to build up potential for reactive rescheduling, we also need some approximation of cumulative lead time to set in relation to delivery lead time. We need this information proactively, that is, during scheduling of orders. In the short term, this allows decisions to be made to accept or refuse orders. In the medium term, we can get an idea of the probable utilization of the work centers along the time axis.



Course section 13.3: Subsections and their intended learning outcomes

  • 13.3 Scheduling of Orders and Scheduling Algorithms

    Intended learning outcomes: Describe the manufacturing calendar and the calculation of the manufacturing lead time. Differentiate between Backward Scheduling and Forward Scheduling. Explain network planning, central point scheduling, the lead-time stretching factor, and probable scheduling. Present scheduling of process trains.

  • 13.3.1 The Manufacturing Calendar, or Shop Calendar

    Intended learning outcomes: Present characteristics of the manufacturing calendar, or shop calendar. Explain an example of a manufacturing calendar.

  • 13.3.2 Lead Time Scheduling: Calculating the Manufacturing Lead Time

    Intended learning outcomes: Produce an overview on lead time scheduling. Identify definitions for the elements of operation time. Present the lead time formula and the start date as a function of completion date. Differentiate between manufacturing lead time, cycle time and throughput time.

  • 13.3.3 Backward Scheduling and Forward Scheduling

    Intended learning outcomes: Produce an overview on lead time scheduling. Explain forward scheduling and backward scheduling. Describe a simple algorithm for backward scheduling.

  • 13.3.4 Network Planning and CPM — Critical Path Method

    Intended learning outcomes: Explain network planning and the critical path method (CPM). Present an example of a scheduled network. Describe a network algorithm for backward scheduling.

  • 13.3.5 Central Point Scheduling

    Intended learning outcomes: Explain central point scheduling. Describe several possible solutions in a directed network of operations.

  • 13.3.6 The Lead-Time-Stretching Factor and Probable Scheduling

    Intended learning outcomes: Produce an overview on order urgency and slack time. Differentiate between forward, backward, and probable scheduling. Explain the role of the lead-time-stretching factor in probable scheduling. Describe the equation for recalculation of lead-time-stretching factor.

  • 13.3.7 Scheduling Process Trains

    Intended learning outcomes: Differentiate between reverse flow scheduling, forward flow scheduling, and mixed flow scheduling.



Course 13: Sections and their intended learning outcomes

  • Course 13 – Time Management and Scheduling

    Intended learning outcomes: Present the elements of time management. Explain in detail knowledge on buffers and queues. Disclose scheduling of orders and scheduling algorithms. Describe splitting and overlapping.

  • 13.1 Elements of Time Management

    Intended learning outcomes: Describe the order of the operations of a production order, operation time and operation load, the elements of interoperation time, administrative time, and transportation time,

  • 13.2 Logistic Buffers and Logistic Queues

    Intended learning outcomes: Explain wait time, buffers, the Funnel Model, and queues as an effect of random load fluctuations. Present conclusions for job shop production. Produce an overview on logistic operating curves.

  • 13.6 Keywords

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  • 13.7 Scenarios and Exercises

    Intended learning outcomes: Assess queues as an effect of random load fluctuations. Calculate examples for network planning, backward scheduling, forward scheduling, the lead-time stretching factor, and probable scheduling.

  • 13.8 References

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