Integral Logistics Management — Operations Management and Supply Chain Management Within and Across Companies

1.1.8b The SCOR Model

Intended learning outcomes: Present the Supply Chain Operations Reference (SCOR) model. Describe levels 1 and 2 of the actual SCOR model.



Figure 1.1.8.1 shows the planning of the comprehensive supply chain as an ongoing synch­ronization of supply with demand in the comprehensive supply chain. The organizational units involved can be independent companies, or profit or cost centers within a company.

Fig. 1.1.8.1        Ongoing synchronization of supply with demand in the comprehensive supply chain.

This task is based on the internal chain of “source,” “make,” and “deliver” in each of the organizational units involved. All demand and capabilities of fulfilling them are carried by the network as a whole and reconciled jointly. Based on this idea, the Supply Chain Council (SCC), founded in 1996, published the Supply Chain Operations Reference model (SCOR®) (see also www.supply-chain.org).

SCOR, the Supply Chain Operations Reference model, is an aid to standardization of process chains within and across companies.

Figure 1.1.8.2 shows level 1 of the actual SCOR model.

Fig. 1.1.8.2        The SCOR model, version 12.0, level 1.

The aim of SCOR is to foster a common understanding of processes in the various companies participating in a supply chain. Figure 1.1.8.3 shows the six process categories and 30 reference processes defined by level 2 of the actual SCOR model.

Fig. 1.1.8.3        The 6 process categories and 32 reference processes of SCOR version 12.0, Level 2, toolkit.




Course section 1.1: Subsections and their intended learning outcomes